The Hard Skills of a Job Hunter

math-and-frustrationI’ve been on the job hunt for a while now, stretching back to before I graduated in May. It’s not been easy, in fact it’s been a slog. But as I was shipping off a few more resumes this morning, I got to thinking about the skills I’ve gathered during this time. Few would advocate for having a section on your resume titled “Job Hunting (date-date)” with these items listed underneath, but there are some real benefits. I call these “hard skills”, not in the traditional hard/soft skill dichotomoy, but more because they’re really hard earned. For example:

-Ability to successfully navigate poorly designed systems.

Now, you don’t want to tell an employer that their application system is deeply flawed, but most are. Most of the time it’s not explicitly the fault of the employer- maybe they had an intern do it in-house, or they’ve bought into an inexpensive package that they had little input in designing. Whatever the situation may be, only the most nimble of job hunter can navigate the murky language, unclear instructions and tricky required items of the system. It takes practice!

-Ascertain the difference between employer needs and employer wish list.

Every job hunter has come across a mile-long laundry list of skills an employer “requires” or “prefers”. With time, we learn that  A.) our skill sets are in fact plenty for most employers and B.) that no single individual has the entire list of skills listed, except perhaps for the person leaving the job being advertised.

-Self-starter able to maintain positive attitude during the darkest of days.

I have yet to meet a job hunter who hasn’t occasionally slumped into a chair, declared everything a failure and spent the day binge-watching that show they won’t admit they love. The truly talented job hunter is able to bounce back and get right back to it the next day. There’s no shame in self-care.

-Doggedly persistent in seemingly futile causes.

People with jobs often tell job hunters “Don’t give up! The market is hard, but something will work out.” To job hunters, this sounds exactly like Charlie Brown’s teacher. The market (especially for archivists *cough*) is bloody awful, and we have no reason to believe that today will be our lucky day. Yet we get up again, turn on the computer, tweak our resumes, craft beautiful cover letters and send them off. If that’s not a marketable skill, I don’t know what is.

What did I miss? What’s a skill that you would add?

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